Teaching with Primary Sources


Teaching with the Library of Congress
  • Using Literary Maps in the Classroom
    Have you ever considered using a literary map with your students? In the May/June 2018 issue of Social Education, the journal of the National Council for the Social Studies, our “Sources and Strategies” article features literary maps f...
  • Documenting World War I: Women Photographers on the Front Lines
    In 2017 we highlighted the work of female photojournalists Helen Johns Kirtland and Toni Frissel. During World War I Kirtland, one of many photographers putting faces and places to “the war to end all wars,” did photographic work ...
  • History isn’t boring! Final thoughts from a year well spent
    This post is by Matthew Poth, 2017-18 Library of Congress Teacher in Residence. When the last day of the 2016-17 school year loomed and everyone at my school rushed to ensure that everything was wrapped up, I had the bittersweet knowledge that I w...
  • Another Look at World War I Recruiting Songs
    Music has always been a part of major events in history, frequently used to persuade listeners to adopt a point of view or to take action. This was certainly the case during World War I.
  • “When Johnny Comes Marching Home” Marches Across Time
    Sometimes listeners are surprised to find a familiar tune lurking behind the lyrics of a new song. Songwriters may revisit and reuse existing compositions, hoping to catch a listener’s attention through something familiar. The Civil War era ...
  • Uncle Sam: Another Look at an American Icon
    Uncle Sam is not only one of the most recognizable symbols of the United States, but also one of the most long-lived. He's been around for more than two centuries, and has taken on different roles, different outfits, and even different faces throu...
  • How the Playground Movement Made a Case for Play
    What was the great cause that brought together civic leaders, public health officials, and the president of the United States? Playgrounds.
  • What Did Lincoln Say about Extemporaneous Speaking?
    As any debate team knows, the ability to communicate arguments and craft rebuttals extemporaneously can be essential. We began wondering how historically well-regarded orators fared with extemporaneous speaking. What might President Abraham Lincol...
  • New Online Collection: The Woodrow Wilson Papers
    We're delighted to announce that the Woodrow Wilson Papers are now online. Held in the Library of Congress Manuscript Division, these papers constitute the largest collection of original Wilson documents in the world, and provide teachers and stud...
  • Analyzing Propaganda’s Role in World War I
    At the start of World War I, however, posters offered a powerful tool to reach and influence citizens of every social, educational, and racial background.